The library, and step on it!

thenarratologist:

READING LIST: Maritime Adventures
There is something about the open ocean that has intrigued artists since man first learned to build a boat. Surviving at sea is a battle with nature, with the gods, with your other crew members, or with yourself (and if you’re Odysseus, all of them at once).
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thenarratologist:

READING LIST: Maritime Adventures

There is something about the open ocean that has intrigued artists since man first learned to build a boat. Surviving at sea is a battle with nature, with the gods, with your other crew members, or with yourself (and if you’re Odysseus, all of them at once).

Read More


thenarratologist:

BOOK REVIEW: The Rainbow (1915) by D.H. Lawrence
When I was on holiday in the UK this summer, me and my family paid a visit to the birth house of D.H. Lawrence at my request. I had read Lady Chatterley’s Lover once a number of years ago and couldn’t remember that much about it other than that I thought it was a bit weird and that I didn’t really like, but on a two-week trip deprived of any other literary value, I figured I’d take what I could get. The tiny museum and its enthusiastic guide rekindled my interest and inspired me to give Lawrence another try. After all, I’d come around to Virginia Woolf in a big way, so maybe Lawrence could win me over as well now that I had some more reading under my belt. However, I still had some reservations; one word that I had often come across in connection to Lawrence was “misogyny.” Still, my aunt recommended The Rainbow to me and in the spirit of “well, when in Nottinghamshire,” I started reading it right away.
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thenarratologist:

BOOK REVIEW: The Rainbow (1915) by D.H. Lawrence

When I was on holiday in the UK this summer, me and my family paid a visit to the birth house of D.H. Lawrence at my request. I had read Lady Chatterley’s Lover once a number of years ago and couldn’t remember that much about it other than that I thought it was a bit weird and that I didn’t really like, but on a two-week trip deprived of any other literary value, I figured I’d take what I could get. The tiny museum and its enthusiastic guide rekindled my interest and inspired me to give Lawrence another try. After all, I’d come around to Virginia Woolf in a big way, so maybe Lawrence could win me over as well now that I had some more reading under my belt. However, I still had some reservations; one word that I had often come across in connection to Lawrence was “misogyny.” Still, my aunt recommended The Rainbow to me and in the spirit of “well, when in Nottinghamshire,” I started reading it right away.

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thenarratologist:

BOOK REVIEW: Little Tales of Misogyny (1974) by Patricia Highsmith
I came across this tiny little book in an antiques store in West Kirby and the second I laid eyes on it I knew that I had to have it (and the owner gave it to me for free because sometimes the world is wonderful like that). I’d been curious about Patricia Highsmith’s work for some time, the title is hilarious, and the serenely smiling 1950’s housewife on the cover made it even better.
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thenarratologist:

BOOK REVIEW: Little Tales of Misogyny (1974) by Patricia Highsmith

I came across this tiny little book in an antiques store in West Kirby and the second I laid eyes on it I knew that I had to have it (and the owner gave it to me for free because sometimes the world is wonderful like that). I’d been curious about Patricia Highsmith’s work for some time, the title is hilarious, and the serenely smiling 1950’s housewife on the cover made it even better.

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"In the universe, there are things that are known, and things that are unknown. And, in between, there are doors."
— William Blake  (via thymoss)

thenarratologist:

READING LIST: Art
Literature and the visual arts have a long history of inspiring one another, from John Everett Millais painting Shakespeare’s Ophelia in 1852 to the plot of Donna Tartt’s Pulitzer-winning novel revolving around “The Goldfinch” (1654) by Fabritius.
The books on this list either have artist protagonists or centre around art itself.
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thenarratologist:

READING LIST: Art

Literature and the visual arts have a long history of inspiring one another, from John Everett Millais painting Shakespeare’s Ophelia in 1852 to the plot of Donna Tartt’s Pulitzer-winning novel revolving around “The Goldfinch” (1654) by Fabritius.

The books on this list either have artist protagonists or centre around art itself.

Read More




"If you asked me now who I am, the only answer I could give with any certainty would be my name. For the rest: my loves, my hates, down even to my deepest desires, I can no longer say whether these emotions are my own, or stolen from those I once so desperately wished to be.” 

"If you asked me now who I am, the only answer I could give with any certainty would be my name. For the rest: my loves, my hates, down even to my deepest desires, I can no longer say whether these emotions are my own, or stolen from those I once so desperately wished to be.” 


"It is well known that Mr Day broke off his intention of marrying Sabrina, the girl whom he had educated for this purpose, because, within a few weeks of the time fixed for the wedding, she was guilty of the frivolity, while on a visit from home, of wearing thin sleeves."

The Life of Charlotte Brontë, Elizabeth Gaskell.

I will never ever get over Victorian etiquette.

(via the-library-and-step-on-it)

…………………..

The Mr. Day mentioned, Thomas Day, died in 1789, long before Victoria was even born, much less reigning, so technically Gaskell was speaking of Georgian etiquette. 

(via bankston)

Oh no, I did the thing I have lectured so many other people on in the past! This is what happens when you don’t pay attention to the dates mentioned in the book and only look at the work’s publication date, my mistake.


booksandsugarquills:

September Book Photo Challenge - Day 19: Book to Movie/TV

I watched the BBC TV miniseries of North and South in one evening and loved it! So I thought I’d buy the book.

booksandsugarquills:

September Book Photo Challenge - Day 19: Book to Movie/TV

I watched the BBC TV miniseries of North and South in one evening and loved it! So I thought I’d buy the book.


"It is well known that Mr Day broke off his intention of marrying Sabrina, the girl whom he had educated for this purpose, because, within a few weeks of the time fixed for the wedding, she was guilty of the frivolity, while on a visit from home, of wearing thin sleeves."

The Life of Charlotte Brontë, Elizabeth Gaskell.

I will never ever get over Victorian etiquette.

posted 1 day ago with 34 notes