The library, and step on it!

wwonder:

The Keats-Shelley Museum in Rome (which I am determined to actually visit this year) has this shirt. It’s my current favorite thing.
edit: people are actually reblogging this, so the link to buy it is here! they also have a very cute ode to a nightingale shirt 

wwonder:

The Keats-Shelley Museum in Rome (which I am determined to actually visit this year) has this shirt. It’s my current favorite thing.

edit: people are actually reblogging this, so the link to buy it is here! they also have a very cute ode to a nightingale shirt 

posted 16 hours ago via wwonder with 66 notes

thefictionologist:

“It’s shaming sometimes, how the body will not, or cannot, lie about emotions. Who, for decorum’s sake, has ever slowed his heart, or muted a blush?” -Ian McEwan, On Chesil Beach

thefictionologist:

“It’s shaming sometimes, how the body will not, or cannot, lie about emotions. Who, for decorum’s sake, has ever slowed his heart, or muted a blush?” -Ian McEwan, On Chesil Beach


"I got to thinking that poems were like people. Some people you got right off the bat. Some people you just didn’t get - and would never get."
Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, Benjamin Alire Sáenz.
posted 1 day ago with 117 notes

thefictionologist:

April Book Photo Challenge: Day 7 - Socially Awkward Character

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell


"But what is to become of all these diaries, I asked myself yesterday. If I died, what would Leo make of them? He would be disinclined to burn them; he could not publish them. Well, he should make up a book from them, I think; & then burn the body. I daresay there is a little book in them: if the scraps & scratches were straightened out a little. God knows.
This is dictated by a slight melancholia, which comes upon me sometimes now, & makes me think I am old: I am ugly. I am repeating things. Yet, as far as I know, as a writer I am only now writing out my mind."
— Virginia Woolf, from a diary entry dated, 20 March 1926 (via wavingtovirginia)

"There is, I think, a transactional element inherent in fiction. A reader will only buy a certain amount of clumsy explanation before she needs something in return, something else to compel her attention, something like a plot or a convincing relationship. Without the drama of the human experience, the reader is left holding pages of rules and regulations that are roughly as interesting as a Dungeons & Dragons rulebook (which can be quite interesting, but only if the reader is planning to actually play the game). Ornate systems of mythical histories and commandments tend to lack the meat and movement of successful fiction—that is why people read The Silmarillion or Quidditch Through the Ages after having read The Lord of the Rings and the Harry Potter series, not the other way around."
posted 2 days ago via therumpus with 76 notes

thenarratologist:

BOOK REVIEW: “The Bone Clocks” (2014) by David Mitchell
If I had to sum up my thoughts about this book in one phrase, it would be “I see what you did there.” David Mitchell is an incredibly self-conscious writer and nowhere is that more visible than in The Bone Clocks. This novel is full of references to Mitchell’s other works (hi Jacob de Zoet!), meta jokes about writers whose style he attempts to emulate (hi Martin Amis!), and barely veiled criticisms of the very book you’re holding. It is a well-crafted work and a great showcase of Mitchell’s gift for jumping from one writing style to another. However, admiring an author’s skill is not enough. A true magician can make you believe his assistant is levitating even when you can see the strings holding her up, and despite Mitchell’s arsenal of tricks and gadgets, The Bone Clocks fails to keep the illusion alive where it really matters. Ironically, it’s the fantasy elements where the mirage falls apart.
Read More

thenarratologist:

BOOK REVIEW: “The Bone Clocks” (2014) by David Mitchell

If I had to sum up my thoughts about this book in one phrase, it would be “I see what you did there.” David Mitchell is an incredibly self-conscious writer and nowhere is that more visible than in The Bone Clocks. This novel is full of references to Mitchell’s other works (hi Jacob de Zoet!), meta jokes about writers whose style he attempts to emulate (hi Martin Amis!), and barely veiled criticisms of the very book you’re holding. It is a well-crafted work and a great showcase of Mitchell’s gift for jumping from one writing style to another. However, admiring an author’s skill is not enough. A true magician can make you believe his assistant is levitating even when you can see the strings holding her up, and despite Mitchell’s arsenal of tricks and gadgets, The Bone Clocks fails to keep the illusion alive where it really matters. Ironically, it’s the fantasy elements where the mirage falls apart.

Read More


"Reading a novel about people taking drugs is like being at a party where everyone else is stoned."
posted 2 days ago with 16 notes


rumplestiltskin asked: "Hi, I saw your Fitzgerald books :) I've been looking for those like crazy. Would you mind telling me where did you get it from. I would love to have those books added to my collection as well. Thank you :)"

You find them all on Book Depository!

posted 3 days ago with 5 notes