The library, and step on it!

posted 3 hours ago with 24 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

aliewa:

grouchythefish:

ladyofpurple:

I like how the original title for The Fault in Our Stars is all poetic and then the Norwegians just translated it to “fuck destiny” and I think that’s beautiful

Aw man, I thought for sure this had to be bullshit but nope


Why is it always Norway

Norway, a nation where you can put the word “fuck” on the cover of a young adult novel.

fishingboatproceeds:

aliewa:

grouchythefish:

ladyofpurple:

I like how the original title for The Fault in Our Stars is all poetic and then the Norwegians just translated it to “fuck destiny” and I think that’s beautiful

Aw man, I thought for sure this had to be bullshit but nope

image

Why is it always Norway

Norway, a nation where you can put the word “fuck” on the cover of a young adult novel.


thenarratologist:

The new semester has started, which means that students all over the world are currently panicking over their reading lists and whether they will be able to get it all done. To make life a little bit easier for you, here is a quick introduction to a text that will definitely be on many a syllabus.


"

since feeling is first
who pays any attention
to the syntax of things
will never wholly kiss you;
wholly to be a fool
while Spring is in the world

my blood approves,
and kisses are a better fate
than wisdom
lady i swear by all flowers. Don’t cry
—the best gesture of my brain is less than
your eyelids’ flutter which says

we are for each other: then
laugh, leaning back in my arms
for life’s not a paragraph

And death i think is no parenthesis

"
— E. E. Cummings, Since Feeling Is First (via colporteur)
posted 1 day ago via thymoss · © sunrec with 897 notes

wavingtovirginia:

 T.S. Eliot, in his obituary for Virginia Woolf,  from “The Bloomsbury Group: A Collection of Memoirs and Commentary”

wavingtovirginia:

 T.S. Eliot, in his obituary for Virginia Woolf,  from “The Bloomsbury Group: A Collection of Memoirs and Commentary”


8/12! How did you guys do?

posted 1 day ago with 27 notes

"… having a superstitious wish to begin To the Lighthouse the first day at Monks House. I now think I shall finish it in the two months there. The word ‘sentimental’ sticks in my gizzard (I’ll write it out of me in a story—). But this theme may be sentimental; father & mother & child in the garden: the death; the sail to the lighthouse. I think, though, that when I begin it I shall enrich it in all sorts of ways; thicken it; give it branches & roots which I do not perceive now. It might contain all characters boiled down; & childhood; & then this impersonal thing, which I’m dared to do by my friends, the flight of time, & the consequent break of unity in my design. That passage (I conceive the book in 3 parts: 1. at the drawing room window; 2. seven years passed; 3. the voyage:) interests me very much. A new problem like that breaks fresh ground in ones mind; prevents the regular ruts."
— Virginia Woolf, from a diary entry on “To The Lighthouse (via wavingtovirginia)

"(But while I try to write, I am making up “To the Lighthouse”—the sea is to be heard all through it. I have an idea that I will invent a new name for my books to supplant “novel”. A new —— by Virginia Woolf. But what? Elegy?)"
— Virginia Woolf, A Writer’s Diary (via wavingtovirginia)

Anonymous asked: "Hello! First of all, your blog is amazing and I´ve discovered great books thanks to you :) I recently finished ``At swim, two boys´´ and I really loved it, but I´ve a question about the last chapter, specially the last lines where (SPOILERS) Jim sees and follows Doyle across the window. I´ve heard different interpretations about the end, so I´d wanted to know your opinion about it (and of the whole book) if you don´t mind. Thank you ;)"

First, I’m sorry that it took me so long to reply to your message, but I read At Swim, Two Boys once about three years ago and I couldn’t really remember the details. I wouldn’t know where to begin with this book as a whole because there is so much to it, but I did look up those final pages again so I could take another look at those lines you were referring to.

It seems to me that Jim used to dream about Doyler regularly and look for his face in the crowds, but as time goes by the immediate grief has become a scar and those sharp memories have faded, even though Doyler is still there in the back of his mind (or rather, his absence is). In the final paragraph of the book it says that Jim only looked for Doyler again years later as he lay “broken and fevered […] the last time in MacMurrough’s arms.” To me, this sounds like Jim is dying and Doyler is waving to him from “the other side”, as it were. It’s his ultimate happy memory, the one moment that comes to him before death. In a way, Doyler is the light at the end of his tunnel.

image

Oh my God.

Just thinking about these characters and their story has made me sad all over again. It’s been years and I’m still not over the complete and utter heartbreak of this book.

posted 2 days ago with 3 notes

Anonymous asked: "Do you have any popular poets whose poems you just didn't get or unable to enjoy? Also, congrats for your new site! :)"

I suppose I’m not as into Romantic poetry as many other people are (I’m more interested in the poets themselves than in their work), but I can still enjoy it when the mood strikes.

And thank you so much!

posted 2 days ago with 3 notes