The library, and step on it!

as-howarth asked: "Hey John, what is your reaction to the news that the Riverside district has chosen to ban TFIOS from middle school libraries on the grounds that it deals with mortality and sex? I remember your reactions to similar situations concerning your books have been pretty animated and wondered what you thought?"

fishingboatproceeds:

I guess I am both happy and sad.

I am happy because apparently young people in Riverside, California will never witness or experience mortality since they won’t be reading my book, which is great for them.

But I am also sad because I was really hoping I would be able to introduce the idea that human beings die to the children of Riverside, California and thereby crush their dreams of immortality.


fishingboatproceeds:

aliewa:

grouchythefish:

ladyofpurple:

I like how the original title for The Fault in Our Stars is all poetic and then the Norwegians just translated it to “fuck destiny” and I think that’s beautiful

Aw man, I thought for sure this had to be bullshit but nope


Why is it always Norway

Norway, a nation where you can put the word “fuck” on the cover of a young adult novel.

fishingboatproceeds:

aliewa:

grouchythefish:

ladyofpurple:

I like how the original title for The Fault in Our Stars is all poetic and then the Norwegians just translated it to “fuck destiny” and I think that’s beautiful

Aw man, I thought for sure this had to be bullshit but nope

image

Why is it always Norway

Norway, a nation where you can put the word “fuck” on the cover of a young adult novel.


matthewgaydos:

An abundance of An Abundance Of Katherines #P4A

matthewgaydos:

An abundance of An Abundance Of Katherines #P4A



keepitspooky:

I asked John Green to write a Card Against Humanity for me. This is what he wrote.

keepitspooky:

I asked John Green to write a Card Against Humanity for me. This is what he wrote.


fishingboatproceeds:

For today’s video, I thought I’d share with you 18 books I love that you probably haven’t read. Each of these books has stuck with me over the years. I hope you’ll include in comments a book you loved that hasn’t found as broad an audience as you think it deserves. I’m going to read 18 of those and review them in a future vlogbrothers video.



Anonymous asked: "hey, is the crash course literature any good? i wanna know more about lit but i'm so iffy about john green, i really dislike him, and i don't know if i can trust his videos. thanks!"

I think the videos do a good job at introducing a book and offering a bit more information for both literature students and newcomers, and I really love the animations. I don’t always agree entirely with the offered interpretations, but they’re interesting and fun overall.

As for John Green, I find it difficult to say if you can enjoy the videos when you really dislike him. Not only is he the only presenter, but the scripts have his signature quick-fire jokey style all over them as well. Personally, I find him very likable and I think his enthusiasm works really well for the Crash Course channel, so my advice would be to watch a video or two and then make a decision.

posted 4 months ago with 8 notes

thecrashcourse:

The Poetry of Sylvia Plath: Crash Course Literature 216

In which John Green teaches you about the poetry of Sylvia Plath. When a lot of people think about Sylvia Plath, they think about her struggles with mental illness and her eventual suicide. Her actual work can get lost in the shuffle a bit, so this video really tries to focus on the poetry. You’ll learn about Sylvia Plath’s role as a feminist poet, and you’ll also learn about her extraordinary ability to recreate the experiences of real life in beautiful and relatable way.


thecrashcourse:

Langston Hughes & the Harlem Renaissance: Crash Course Literature 215

In which John Green teaches you about the poetry of Langston Hughes. Langston Hughes was a poet and playwright in the first half of the 20th century, and he was involved in the Harlem Renaissance, which was a cultural movement among African Americans of the time that produced all kinds of great works in literature, poetry, painting, sculpture, music, and other areas. The Harlem Renaissance mainly happened in Harlem, the traditionally black neighborhood in upper Manhattan in New York City. Langston Hughes was primarily known as a poet, but he was involved deeply in the movement itself as well. John will teach you a bit about Hughes’s background, and he’ll examine a few of his best known poems.