The library, and step on it!

FROM THE VAULTS:
HIV/AIDS in American Literature
Heaven’s Coast, Mark Doty
I no longer think of AIDS as a solvent, but perhaps rather as a kind of intensifier, something which makes things more firmly, deeply themselves. Is this true of all terminal illness, that it intensifies the degree of what already is? Watching Wally, watching friends who were either sick themselves or giving care to those who were, I saw that they simply became more generous or terrified, more cranky or afraid, more doubtful or more trusting, more contemplative or more in flight. As individual and unpredictable as this illness seems to be, the one thing I found I could say with certainty was this: AIDS makes things more intensely what they already are.
Angels In America, Tony Kushner
I’ve lived through such terrible times and there are people who live through much worse. But you see them living anyway. […] Death usually has to take life away. I don’t know if that’s just the animal. I don’t know if it’s not braver to die, but I recognize the habit; the addiction to being alive. So we live past hope. If I can find hope anywhere, that’s it, that’s the best I can do. It’s so much not enough. It’s so inadequate. But still, bless me anyway. I want more life.
The Normal Heart, Larry Kramer
We’re all going to go crazy, living this epidemic every minute, while the rest of the world goes on out there, all around us, as if nothing is happening, going on with their own lives and not knowing what it’s like, what we’re going through. We’re living through war, but where they’re living it’s peacetime, and we’re all in the same country. 
Hospital Time, Amy Hoffman
The patient lies in the ICU, and you charge in gabbing about the weather, which you have brought into the room: you shake the rain from your hair, or the cold air reddens your cheeks and clings to your coat, or sweat beads on your upper lip and dampens the hair on your temples. You draw the patient’s attention to the view from the window, the time of day: the sun, the moon, the clouds. Your vigor, your life outside, is an affront. It’s utterly frivolous, the world and its stupid times. Here in the hospital is the real thing. Eternity.
Borrowed Time: An AIDS Memoir, Paul Monette
Being scared is not the same as being convinced. Fear still has the room to maneuver, and every wave of its energy goes into pushing the terrible thing away, like the ocean leaving a body on the sand.
The Man With Night Sweats, Thom Gunn
My thoughts are crowded with death and it draws so oddly on the sexual that I am confused confused to be attracted by, in effect, my own annihilation.
And The Band Played On: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic, Randy Shilts
The story of the first Wall Street Journal piece on the epidemic would later be cited in journalism reviews as emblematic of how the media handled AIDS in the first years of the epidemic. The reporter, it turned out, had long been pressuring editors to run a story on the homosexual disorder. He had even written a piece in 1981 that the editors refused to print. Finally, the reporter was able to fashion an article around the twenty-three heterosexuals, largely intravenous drug users, who were now counted among GRID patients. With confirmation of bona fide heterosexuals, the story finally merited sixteen paragraphs deep in the largest-circulation daily newspaper in the United States, under the headline: ‘New, Often-Fatal Illness in Homosexuals Turns Up in Women, Heterosexual Males.’The gay plague got covered only because it finally had struck people who counted, people who were not homosexuals.

Note: There are no downloads for these books, so I have included links to Amazon. 

FROM THE VAULTS:

HIV/AIDS in American Literature

Heaven’s Coast, Mark Doty

I no longer think of AIDS as a solvent, but perhaps rather as a kind of intensifier, something which makes things more firmly, deeply themselves. Is this true of all terminal illness, that it intensifies the degree of what already is? Watching Wally, watching friends who were either sick themselves or giving care to those who were, I saw that they simply became more generous or terrified, more cranky or afraid, more doubtful or more trusting, more contemplative or more in flight. As individual and unpredictable as this illness seems to be, the one thing I found I could say with certainty was this: AIDS makes things more intensely what they already are.

Angels In America, Tony Kushner

I’ve lived through such terrible times and there are people who live through much worse. But you see them living anyway. […] Death usually has to take life away. I don’t know if that’s just the animal. I don’t know if it’s not braver to die, but I recognize the habit; the addiction to being alive. So we live past hope. If I can find hope anywhere, that’s it, that’s the best I can do. It’s so much not enough. It’s so inadequate. But still, bless me anyway. I want more life.

The Normal Heart, Larry Kramer

We’re all going to go crazy, living this epidemic every minute, while the rest of the world goes on out there, all around us, as if nothing is happening, going on with their own lives and not knowing what it’s like, what we’re going through. We’re living through war, but where they’re living it’s peacetime, and we’re all in the same country. 

Hospital Time, Amy Hoffman

The patient lies in the ICU, and you charge in gabbing about the weather, which you have brought into the room: you shake the rain from your hair, or the cold air reddens your cheeks and clings to your coat, or sweat beads on your upper lip and dampens the hair on your temples. You draw the patient’s attention to the view from the window, the time of day: the sun, the moon, the clouds. Your vigor, your life outside, is an affront. It’s utterly frivolous, the world and its stupid times. Here in the hospital is the real thing. Eternity.

Borrowed Time: An AIDS Memoir, Paul Monette

Being scared is not the same as being convinced. Fear still has the room to maneuver, and every wave of its energy goes into pushing the terrible thing away, like the ocean leaving a body on the sand.

The Man With Night Sweats, Thom Gunn

My thoughts are crowded with death 
and it draws so oddly on the sexual 
that I am confused 
confused to be attracted 
by, in effect, my own annihilation.

And The Band Played On: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic, Randy Shilts

The story of the first Wall Street Journal piece on the epidemic would later be cited in journalism reviews as emblematic of how the media handled AIDS in the first years of the epidemic. The reporter, it turned out, had long been pressuring editors to run a story on the homosexual disorder. He had even written a piece in 1981 that the editors refused to print. Finally, the reporter was able to fashion an article around the twenty-three heterosexuals, largely intravenous drug users, who were now counted among GRID patients. With confirmation of bona fide heterosexuals, the story finally merited sixteen paragraphs deep in the largest-circulation daily newspaper in the United States, under the headline: ‘New, Often-Fatal Illness in Homosexuals Turns Up in Women, Heterosexual Males.’
The gay plague got covered only because it finally had struck people who counted, people who were not homosexuals.

Note: There are no downloads for these books, so I have included links to Amazon. 

posted 1 year ago with 78 notes

  1. sonjagelin reblogged this from the-library-and-step-on-it
  2. halfsickofshadow reblogged this from the-library-and-step-on-it
  3. anindiscriminatecollection reblogged this from the-library-and-step-on-it
  4. ianstagram reblogged this from fear-and-loathing-in-cambridge
  5. fear-and-loathing-in-cambridge reblogged this from the-library-and-step-on-it
  6. twinklingray reblogged this from the-library-and-step-on-it
  7. alliesequalitynetwork reblogged this from the-library-and-step-on-it
  8. georgemichaeldouglas reblogged this from the-library-and-step-on-it
  9. ohmydarkestplace reblogged this from the-library-and-step-on-it
  10. sketchyandspook reblogged this from markcampbells
  11. markcampbells reblogged this from the-library-and-step-on-it
  12. iamthepriorprophet reblogged this from dinizzle
  13. dinizzle reblogged this from the-library-and-step-on-it and added:
    PRIOR
  14. postapocalypticarisen reblogged this from chantrykomori
  15. rampanthetters reblogged this from onetothestate
  16. querulouschutney reblogged this from onetothestate
  17. serazienne reblogged this from onetothestate
  18. onetothestate reblogged this from the-library-and-step-on-it
  19. acerulean reblogged this from the-library-and-step-on-it