The library, and step on it!

foodbookandteablog asked: "I'm reading A Trip to the Stars by Nicholas Christopher and I like to imagine that Alma/ Mala is South American so yeah"

Excellent, thank you for sharing your pick!

posted 4 hours ago

"Summer was here again. Summer, summer, summer. I loved and hated summers. Summers had a logic all on their own and they always brought something out in me. Summer was supposed to be about freedom and youth and no school and possibilities and adventure and exploration. Summer was a book of hope. That’s why I loved and hated summers. Because they made me want to believe."
— Benjamin Alire Sáenz, Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe (via larmoyante)

lovingsylvia:

Sylvia and Ted “interrupted in a spat,” Chalot Square, London, July 25, 1960 photographed by Hans Beacham for a portfolio of images of British writers

"They were sullen. Hughes was rude. He was going to get more attention than she, and she didn’t like that while he did. He invited me outside and told me I needed to know that he loathed photographers". Hughes particularly wanted to keep Plath out of the way. "His wish, of course, forced me to photograph them together", Beacham said; and later; Hughes acknowledged that he had been "an ogre."

—Diane Middlebrook, Her Husband: Hughes and Plath-a Marriage, 2003


"All the literati keep at least one imaginary friend."

Anonymous asked: "Could you do a 'from the vaults' for short story collections? Or if that's too general a category, could you share some of your favourites?"

You’re right, I do think it is too general a category (it’s more a form than a topic or theme, you know?), but I did post a Top 5 recently!

posted 7 hours ago with 1 note

Looking at my list of literary heroines again, I suddenly realised that almost of my picks are white (Katniss Everdeen excepted).

This is a gross oversight that needs to be fixed, so I’m calling all of you up to tell me who your favourite literary heroine of colour is!

posted 14 hours ago with 22 notes


the secret history meme:  [2/5] quotes
↳ Chapter 2, pg 100

There is a recurrent scene from those dinners that surfaces again and again, like an obsessive undercurrent in a dream. Julian, at the head of the long table, rises to his feet and lifts his wineglass. “Live forever,” he says. 
And the rest of us rise too, and clink our glasses across the table, like an army regiment crossing sabres: Henry and Bunny, Charles and Francis, Camilla and I. “Live forever,” we chorus, throwing our glasses back in unison. 
And always, always that same toast. Live forever.

the secret history meme:  [2/5] quotes

↳ Chapter 2, pg 100

There is a recurrent scene from those dinners that surfaces again and again, like an obsessive undercurrent in a dream. Julian, at the head of the long table, rises to his feet and lifts his wineglass. “Live forever,” he says.

And the rest of us rise too, and clink our glasses across the table, like an army regiment crossing sabres: Henry and Bunny, Charles and Francis, Camilla and I. “Live forever,” we chorus, throwing our glasses back in unison.

And always, always that same toast. Live forever.


booksactually:

"I knew I had fallen in love with Lolita forever; but I also knew she would not be forever Lolita."—from Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

booksactually:

"I knew I had fallen in love with Lolita forever; but I also knew she would not be forever Lolita."

—from Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov


redlipstickcase:

I’ve just got these five books from the Vintage War series from Vintage Classics today and I’ve decided I’m gonna make some pretty pictures and put them up for y’all to admire this super duper edition of best of the best books on not so happy topic - war.

I can’t wait to start reading them (but I have to, school stuff) and also buying more of these. I plan to get the whole edition (12 books) so I’m gonna put a picture of all of them together when I’ll have them.

I don’t usually buy 20th century (and 21st obviously) in Vintage Classics edition because I wanted to mainly stick with the Penguin Modern Classics, but I just couldn’t not buy these. Plus, they’re the smaller size than most of what I have in my bookshelfs so I can just pretend thy have nothing to do with the rest of my books.


lordmelchett asked: "Hi! I'm doing a biig project in a couple of months and I'm pretty sure I'm going to choose the topic "Literary Heroines" (along the lines of Jane Eyre and Hester Prynne). I just wondered, what characters do you think qualify as the greatest heroines? Your blog is fantastic!"

Oof.

Well, that depends on your definition of both “heroine” and “literature” (why yes, I am that annoying English teacher). Is it any well-written female character? A female character who displays extraordinary courage in some way? A relatable and moral character we can learn from? Anyway, here are some of my picks off the top of my head:

*Rosalind (As You Like It, William Shakespeare)
*Katniss Everdeen (The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins).
*Hermione Granger (Harry Potter, J.K. Rowling)
*Sansa Stark (A Song of Ice and Fire, George R.R. Martin)
*Elizabeth Bennet (Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen)
*Éowyn (The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien)
*Margaret Hale (North and South, Elizabeth Gaskell)
*Lucy Honeychurch (A Room With A View, E.M. Forster)
*Anne Shirley (Anne of Green Gables, L.M. Montgomery)
*Scout Finch (To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee)

posted 15 hours ago with 12 notes