The library, and step on it!

"The only thing I’ve loved is nothing at all. The only thing I’ve desired is what I couldn’t even imagine. All I asked of life is that it go on by without my feeling it. All I demanded of love is that it never stop being a distant dream."
— Fernando Pessoa, The Book of Disquiet  (via mirroir)
posted 7 hours ago via mirroir · © hellanne with 909 notes

"I would suggest that you go and support all bold things. There are really only a handful of plots or situations in the world, and we only expand upon them when we risk something. One’s art—not to mention one’s heart—shrivels if you have too rigid an expectation for everything you see or read or hear. You do not know everything; you have not seen everything. Surprise yourself. Let others surprise you. Get out more. See everything. Love it. Argue about it. Take the shards from what you saw and apply it to what you’re working on. Pass it on. Meet the deadline. Go to the pale judgment. There is no mystery to how these things begin or how they are implemented. The mystery is when it all works."

"I luxuriate more in a whole day alone; a day of easy natural poses; slipping tranquilly off into the deep water of my own thoughts, navigating the underworld."
Virginia Woolf, Diary Entry, 18 June 1926. (via mirroir)

"At 18 this half-breed fell in love, as a boy would do, with someone quite 12 years older than himself who was French and had all the understanding in the world and he loved her in every conceivable way up to the age of 23 or so. And in so doing he learned almost all there is to know about that complex thing, a woman’s heart. [But then] the boy realised he had to grow up and not be a boy any longer, so he turned into a girl, and not an unattractive girl at that, and the boy was locked in a box and put away for ever."

Daphne du Maurier on her male alter ego “Eric Avon.”

As a child, Daphne du Maurier dressed as a boy and took on the name Eric Avon, encouraged by her father who was an actor and desperately wanted to have a son (but ended up with three daughters). For Du Maurier Eric Avon became more than a childhood fantasy; he was the source of her inspiration as a writer and the representation of a repressed side of herself, the part that was attracted to other women.

Du Maurier never identified as bisexual or as a lesbian because it was Eric (“the boy-in-the-box”) who fell in love with women, not her. When she grew older she decided that she “had to grow up” and locked him away, except when she was alone at her house Menability, where she “sometimes let the phantom who was neither girl nor boy but disembodied spirit dance in the evening when there was no one to see”.

posted 8 hours ago with 84 notes

thenarratologist:

A tribute to two of my favourite art forms: literature and musical theatre! If you’ve ever watched Les Mis and found yourself thinking, “you know what this needs? A monologue on the history of the Parisian sewer system”, this is the list for you.


posted 17 hours ago with 41 notes

the-library-and-step-on-it:

Finally I can reveal the project I’ve been working on these last couple of months. My darling followers, I am so proud to present to you:
THE NARRATOLOGIST
http://www.thenarratologist.com/
What is it?
It is a website where I will post book reviews, study advice, reading lists, and longer articles on whatever strikes my fancy. I’m still transferring material from The Library and Step On It! to this new website, so some posts may look familiar, but from now on this is where I will post this kind of material.
I am also working on a glossary so that if you come across an author or literary term you don’t know, you can immediately click on a link and get a brief overview.
But what about the-library-and-step-on-it?
The Library and Step On It! will still exist in its current form and I will keep posting quotes, links to articles, and Photoshop creations here. However, the longer text posts will be put up on The Narratologist. I will post a link on The Library and Step On It! as well so you can keep track of new material. The same goes for my Goodreads account: it will still exist and I will still use it, but I will now start posting links to the website. If you only want to get the links to new Narratologist posts without all the extra stuff, you can follow the Narratologist Tumblr.
One more thing!
You can also follow The Narratologist on Facebook! The page will be updated whenever there is a new post or when I see a picture/video/link that I like and want to share with you, and you can also ask me your questions there.
And finally:
I am very, very excited about this project and I would never have had the courage to create something like this if it hadn’t been for the support of the followers of The Library and Step On It. Your questions, discussions, and words of encouragement over the years have meant the world to me, so from the bottom of my heart: thank you.
If you have any questions/comments/suggestions for any of these platforms, please let me know. This is for you.
Special thanks to:Sanne van Let, the social media guru, IT wizard, and all-around clever person who somehow managed to distill my disconnected thoughts (“something about books”) into a coherent concept.Sarah Meers for the header design and her encyclopaedic knowledge of fonts and icons.

One last time!
I promise I’ll stop spamming you with this, I’m just trying to make sure that everyone has seen it.
Also, make sure that you liked the Facebook page, because I’m putting up some fun stuff on there!

the-library-and-step-on-it:

Finally I can reveal the project I’ve been working on these last couple of months. My darling followers, I am so proud to present to you:

THE NARRATOLOGIST

http://www.thenarratologist.com/

What is it?

It is a website where I will post book reviews, study advice, reading lists, and longer articles on whatever strikes my fancy. I’m still transferring material from The Library and Step On It! to this new website, so some posts may look familiar, but from now on this is where I will post this kind of material.

I am also working on a glossary so that if you come across an author or literary term you don’t know, you can immediately click on a link and get a brief overview.

But what about the-library-and-step-on-it?

The Library and Step On It! will still exist in its current form and I will keep posting quotes, links to articles, and Photoshop creations here. However, the longer text posts will be put up on The Narratologist. I will post a link on The Library and Step On It! as well so you can keep track of new material. The same goes for my Goodreads account: it will still exist and I will still use it, but I will now start posting links to the website. If you only want to get the links to new Narratologist posts without all the extra stuff, you can follow the Narratologist Tumblr.

One more thing!

You can also follow The Narratologist on Facebook! The page will be updated whenever there is a new post or when I see a picture/video/link that I like and want to share with you, and you can also ask me your questions there.

And finally:

I am very, very excited about this project and I would never have had the courage to create something like this if it hadn’t been for the support of the followers of The Library and Step On It. Your questions, discussions, and words of encouragement over the years have meant the world to me, so from the bottom of my heart: thank you.

If you have any questions/comments/suggestions for any of these platforms, please let me know. This is for you.

Special thanks to:
Sanne van Let, the social media guru, IT wizard, and all-around clever person who somehow managed to distill my disconnected thoughts (“something about books”) into a coherent concept.
Sarah Meers for the header design and her encyclopaedic knowledge of fonts and icons.

One last time!

I promise I’ll stop spamming you with this, I’m just trying to make sure that everyone has seen it.

Also, make sure that you liked the Facebook page, because I’m putting up some fun stuff on there!


fishingboatproceeds:

aliewa:

grouchythefish:

ladyofpurple:

I like how the original title for The Fault in Our Stars is all poetic and then the Norwegians just translated it to “fuck destiny” and I think that’s beautiful

Aw man, I thought for sure this had to be bullshit but nope


Why is it always Norway

Norway, a nation where you can put the word “fuck” on the cover of a young adult novel.

fishingboatproceeds:

aliewa:

grouchythefish:

ladyofpurple:

I like how the original title for The Fault in Our Stars is all poetic and then the Norwegians just translated it to “fuck destiny” and I think that’s beautiful

Aw man, I thought for sure this had to be bullshit but nope

image

Why is it always Norway

Norway, a nation where you can put the word “fuck” on the cover of a young adult novel.


thenarratologist:

The new semester has started, which means that students all over the world are currently panicking over their reading lists and whether they will be able to get it all done. To make life a little bit easier for you, here is a quick introduction to a text that will definitely be on many a syllabus.


"

since feeling is first
who pays any attention
to the syntax of things
will never wholly kiss you;
wholly to be a fool
while Spring is in the world

my blood approves,
and kisses are a better fate
than wisdom
lady i swear by all flowers. Don’t cry
—the best gesture of my brain is less than
your eyelids’ flutter which says

we are for each other: then
laugh, leaning back in my arms
for life’s not a paragraph

And death i think is no parenthesis

"
— E. E. Cummings, Since Feeling Is First (via colporteur)
posted 1 day ago via thymoss · © sunrec with 938 notes